Eastern bluebirds- life cycle and methods to protect them

“A bluebird comes tenderly up to alight
And turns to the wind to unruffle a plume,
His song so pitched as not to excite
A single flower as yet to bloom.
It is snowing a flake, and he half knew
Winter was only playing possum.
Except in color he isn’t blue,
But he wouldn’t advise a thing to blossom.”

by Robert Frost

Ok. Here comes the research. Bluebirds prefer forest edges, former woodlands due to burning or cutting, and fields scattered with trees. You’d be lucky if you witnessed one flying along and capturing its prey or gleaning the insects in the treetops.
Additional notes about the parents.

Courting- The male sings and quivers in front of a female, whom he hopes will be his mate. His wings will be about half open, his tail open as he perches. Then, he lands and preens right next to her. If she’s lucky, he may bring her a present of a morsel of food. Is there a human female who doesn’t appreciate a gift?

Next- sex. (Don’t tell the kids that I’m talking about sex. On the other hand, learning about bird sex might make it a lot easier for you when they’re teenagers.) Broods are often conceived by one female and one male. Hmmm. Must be that neither gender is totally faithful to its mate. (That also sounds like some humans.)

Following that- nest building. The easiest way for them would be to take over a former woodpecker cavity that is already excavated. (A young human couple would love to build their house, compare to building or buying a new house. Expensive. On the other hand, humans might start with renting)

If the male needs to build his own nest, he lines it with loose grass, weed stems, pine needles, little twigs, and sometimes hair or feathers. This takes from 10 to 14 days. (This sounds like a lot more work than purchasing a cradle, but then again, I’ve never been lucky to have that experience, so I should just keep my mouth shut. Also, the female will be super busy very soon.)

Like now. Her time has come. She lays 4 to 5 pale blue, or sometimes white and unmarked eggs that are only about 4/10 inch long. Another source stated that they could be8/10 long.

After the eggs are laid, the females sometimes dump one out of the nest. Maybe they feel that food is not plentiful enough to feed all of the chicks about to be born. They might even abandon the eggs altogether. (The human perspective- Any mother who would abandon her children is despicable. However, she might feel that she cannot afford to feed it, provide a good home or education. It would be so much better if both partners could make the decisions together. Personally, I still think that it’s a very sad situation.

Raising the chicks. Ta da! The chicks are born. Great! Once the chicks are born, a parent might still remove a weak chick from the nest. This might be so that more food can be provided for the stronger siblings.

In the case with bluebirds, the female knows that the male will help raise the young. Isn’t it sad that this is not necessarily the case with humans? (I know, it might be a better decision for one human parent or the other to raise the children, so no criticisms, please. A human female might decide to abort a pregnancy, if she doesn’t feel that could afford to feed it, provide a good home or education. It would be so much better if both partners make the decisions together. All of these details don’t make me feel any better for the child.)

I have run out of space. If you want to learn more fascinating comparisons of this bird with humans, or how to help protect them, you could do the research yourself. I would rather have you go to my blog. Did you forget my blog address? Let Mama Ann be of service.

http://annb2.wordpress.com.

 

Like human big brothers and sisters, the bluebird young, of previous broods, help the parents with the newborns.
What do these hungry, hungry, hungry chicks eat? Yes, they are like humans in that respect, too. However, that’s where the similarities stop. Bluebird chicks eat insects- lots of them. They need the protein for a healthy start in life.

Finally, it’s time to head south- just like humans who don’t care for our winters. What do they pack? Food, glorious food. Berries, specifically.

Finally, they’re ready to fly. This is done in flocks of about one hundred. Too bad they can’t catch a plane ride. Maybe they can’t afford the high costs of them.

The Eastern bluebird has been on the U.S,Blue List in 1072, and 1078-82. Also, it was considered of special concern in 1986.

Now, boys and girls, Mama Ann has a little lecture for those of you who need to do more to protect your birds.

1.Of course, provide nesting boxes. I have mine overlooking my big field. I check it regularly. A second one is provided for the nasty house sparrows, which kill the parents and chicks. Here’s a surprise. The starlings don’t harm bluebirds. Maybe they’re too busy causing enough other damage.

2. Plant native trees and shrubs that provide healthy food for them. Whe n winter arrives, berries are sincerely appreciated. I’m in the process of cutting down the nasty tartarian honeysuckles so that there will be room for my new plants, when they arrive. I can hardly wait for them. I ordered cranberry bushes.

3.Leave dead trees standing or on the ground, if they have fallen. I was so sad when my last white birch tree died. However, it was resurrected, so to speak. Insects still like it. Then the birds get the insects. Now, bluebirds probably just glean their insects from shrubs, but the woodpeckers sure do like them.

4. Gather limbs and sticks, that are in unsuitable places for you, and pile them where you want them. Birds and other critters are very appreciative for hiding places.

5. Feed them! This has been a rough winter. I shovel the snow every day. I even shovel under the birdfeeders. Not fun sometimes. However, some birds prefer feeding on the ground. Also, two seed feeders and two peanut feeders can’t possibly feed all the birds that swarm here. I buy fat from the local meat vender. And place thin slices in spaces provided at the ends of my feeders. Some love that.

6. Hang feeders from shepherd’s hooks with baffles under them to prevent squirrels and chipmunks from dominating the feeders.

7. Don’t mow all the grass. You will provide food for many more birds with plants that have gone to seed. Also, it saves money and time from mowing. Now, I do dislike walking among wet plants that could get quite tall, so I mow paths three times a year. Also, I mow a little clearing for entertaining friends in the summer.

Here’s my wish. Here’s hoping that you are kind to your wildlife. Hope these ideas are helpful.

I have a fabulous donation of a photo of a male and female bluebirds couple. You could see that in my upcoming Jamestown Post Journal article on Saturday. The online address of that paper is My articles, mostly about birds, but also wildflowers, appear every other Saturday. To find them go online to geneseebirds-l@geneseo.edu. Then, right below the title of the paper, in a maroon colored line, click on Lifestyles. Finally, on the left, click on nature. I’m usually about the third article down. They have changed their policies. One can no longer allow a person to read the paper online for free. I don’t blame them. Paper newspapers are in trouble. The PJ has an important role in our area, so they need to be able to make more money. I just wish that the increased money earned goes to my wonderful reporter friends’ salaries.

Happy spring, everybody.

Life is good here, challenging, but good.

The challenging part- too much snow, water pipes freezing three times, reduced priced pellets, clothes washing machine leaking like a sieve, on and on. I am so glad that February and March are over.

April projects- pulling insulation from soffets in attic. I’m not looking foward to that. Because I am small, I will do it. I’m a little scared of falling through the floor.* will need to replace the wood floor and carpeting.  I’ll ask a friend to watch me for safety. I hope I have the nerve to do it.

Constructing a second gate to my garden to keep the waskelly wabbits out.

Planting the garden soon. Yeh!

Practicing a Mozart concerto with a friend, who is a retired projessional French horn instrumentalist.

finishing the project of hanging art which I bought cheaply at a thrift shop.

hanging baskets, also from the thrift shop, in my bedroom.

walking outside. Yeh!

feeding my birds. I’m looking forward for them to stop coming, because they’d rather be in the wild.

OK. The birds at my feeder have been fabulous. Let’s see how many I can list.

cooper’s hawk, mourning dove, downy, hairy and red-bellied woodpeckers, blue jay, American crow, black-capped chickadee, tufted titmouse, white and red-breasted nuthatches, American robin, European starling, Northern cardinal, American tree and and white-crowned sparrows, dark-eyed junco, red-winged blackbird, common grackle, brown-headed cowbird (just this morning, ugh), house sparrow, American goldfinch, purple finch.

Bella, my lap mix, and I have enjoyed watching them from  front windows. She’s learned not to bark and to be still.

I’m really looking forward to the spring and summer birds. Bring them on! I hope the bluebirds nest here again.

mammals- rabbits and red squirrels.

I wish all of you a great day and spring!

Ann

 

bird sightings of February 28, and March 1

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Blog 2-28-14

Hi. It is now2:45 p.m. on  February 23, 2014. I am not a happy camper. You haven’t seen this side of me before. You might want to stop reading now. It gets ugly, very ugly. Ok. Wanna know why? Read on.

Organizing. This retired librarian wants to remain retired. Not a chance. I wish for the good old days when my beloved husband did it. He had no right to die 20 years ago. I know. I’m being ugly. It gets worse.

No. I guess I should take photos of my living room. It has changed. Excuse me. I’ll be right back after I exercise the camera some more………Ok. I feel better. Thank you. You will see a change. Very little is positive. Improvements- My laundry is drying by the pellet stove and I am conserving energy by not using an automatic drier of any kind. Bella is asleep and all is quiet on the western front. I have room to walk through the living room safely. I have consolidated piles. I can’t think of anything else. Stay tuned. Another report in about an hour. ……….

I forgot some positive items. I hope you’ll be proud of me. I’ve finished washing one load of clothes for my widow neighbor who does have not running water or a working clothes washer. I’ve just put in the second load.

Here’s a fun thing I’m doing as I do the drudge organizational work. Steve Martin always cheers me up. On TV, I’m watching a hilarious comedy of a family who vacations at a tradition spot on a lake. Problems develop as his wealthy rival of long standing has built a swanky-danky house on the other side of his lake and is abiding there with his kids.

 Ok next blip. I can’t even remember what glich I just had with my computer. I don’t care. It’s working now. Hope I can at least save this. Help!………..Good. My work is saved, I hope.

Maybe if the computer and I just join Bella for a nap. Hey. Wait a minute. I just started a new paragraph! What does that mean? Hold on. I’ll be right back. Oh yah. It is now 3:24 p.m. Please don’t give up. I need you to listen to me.

Ps. It is now February 28 at 7:42 a.m.  Baby, it’s cold outside. (Remember that song). I won’t allow Bella to be outside for more than 5 minutes. It’s only 20 degrees below zero here. She doesn’t complain about coming back inside. She’s even learning to return with her bone. What a good, smart dog.

The basement is only 28 degrees by the water pipes. I’m doing better. I’ve turned on an electric heater and am heating what-cha-me?-call-its on the pellet stove to wrap around the pipes, that aren’t covered by the heater.

My poor birdies. I fed them this morning before they were even venturing out from their roosts in my rhododendron. Even though it’s not native, I’ll never remove it, because of this job it accomplishes for the birds.

I’m not heading out until later to do my errands.

Time- 9:30 a.m.

In cleaning up the piles around here, I found my bird list at my feeders from yesterday:

                House sparrow, male and female juncos, male and female Northern cardinals, chickadee, male goldfinch in transition, tree sparrow, white and red-breasted nuthatches, downy woodpecker, blue jay, tufted titmouse, 12 mourning doves. Today, I’m worried. So far, I’ve seen 9 tree sparrows, 1 downy woodpecker, 2 chickadees, 6 male and 1 female juncos, 2 male cardinals, 2 bluejays and my regular very bad red squirrels. I keep pounding on the window to scare them away. I have to stop that. I need to get other work done.

Uh-oh. I have an important question to ask you. One of my readers informed me that she will not read my blog anymore. She sees enough dead birds and doesn’t wish to read about more tragedies. I have immediately curtailed that practice. Do you agree with her? I really am very disappointed, because I have communicated with her and even wished to visit her in the spring. We have a lot in common. I hope that I can change her mind. I also think that there is plenty of other excellent coverage of the tragedies. I am enjoying being positive. I look forward to your responses.

3-1-14 I still haven’t submitted this blog edition. Sooo . More bird sightings include 1. A raven with crows on route 430, between Sherman and Mayville (less than 1 mile out of Panama and just after the speed limit changes to 55 mph.)

My yard- in my maple trees a white-breasted nuthatch, red-bellied woodpecker. It delights me to see birds in my trees, not just at my feeders.

Now, I really have other work to do.

I hope you are staying safe and warm.

Make it a good day.

birds at my feeders 2-27 and 2-28-14

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Blog 2-28-14

Hi. It is now2:45 p.m. on  February 23, 2014. I am not a happy camper. You haven’t seen this side of me before. You might want to stop reading now. It gets ugly, very ugly. Ok. Wanna know why? Read on.

Organizing. This retired librarian wants to remain retired. Not a chance. I wish for the good old days when my beloved husband did it. He had no right to die 20 years ago. I know. I’m being ugly. It gets worse.

No. I guess I should take photos of my living room. It has changed. Excuse me. I’ll be right back after I exercise the camera some more………Ok. I feel better. Thank you. You will see a change. Very little is positive. Improvements- My laundry is drying by the pellet stove and I am conserving energy by not using an automatic drier of any kind. Bella is asleep and all is quiet on the western front. I have room to walk through the living room safely. I have consolidated piles. I can’t think of anything else. Stay tuned. Another report in about an hour. ……….

I forgot some positive items. I hope you’ll be proud of me. I’ve finished washing one load of clothes for my widow neighbor who does have not running water or a working clothes washer. I’ve just put in the second load.

Here’s a fun thing I’m doing as I do the drudge organizational work. Steve Martin always cheers me up. On TV, I’m watching a hilarious comedy of a family who vacations at a tradition spot on a lake. Problems develop as his wealthy rival of long standing has built a swanky-danky house on the other side of his lake and is abiding there with his kids.

 Ok next blip. I can’t even remember what glich I just had with my computer. I don’t care. It’s working now. Hope I can at least save this. Help!………..Good. I was at least able to save my work, I hope.

Maybe if the computer and I just join Bella for a nap. Hey. Wait a minute. I just started a new paragraph! What does that mean? Hold on. I’ll be right back. Oh yah. It is now 3:24 p.m. Please don’t give up. I need you to listen to me.

Ps. It is now February 28 at 7:42 a.m.  Baby, it’s cold outside. (Remember that song). I won’t allow Bella to be outside for more than 5 minutes. It’s only 20 degrees below zero here. She doesn’t complain about coming back inside. She’s even learning to return with her bone. What a good, smart dog.

The basement is only 28 degrees by the water pipes. I’m doing better. I’ve turned on an electric heater and am heating what-cha-me?-call-its on the pellet stove to wrap around the pipes, that aren’t covered by the heater.

My poor birdies. I fed them this morning before they were even venturing out from their roosts in my rhododendron. Even though it’s not native, I’ll never remove it, because of this job it accomplishes for the birds.

I’m not heading out until later to do my errands.

Time- 9:30 a.m.

In cleaning up the piles around here, I found my bird list at my feeders from yesterday:

                House sparrow, male and female juncos, male and female Northern cardinals, chickadee, male goldfinch in transition, tree sparrow, white and red-breasted nuthatches, downy woodpecker, blue jay, tufted titmouse, 12 mourning doves. Today, I’m worried. So far, I’ve seen 9 tree sparrows, 1 downy woodpecker, 2 chickadees, 6 male and 1 female juncos, 2 male cardinals, 2 bluejays and my regular very bad red squirrels. I keep pounding on the window to scare them away. I have to stop that. I need to get other work done.

Uh-oh. I have an important question to ask you. One of my readers informed me that she will not read my blog anymore. She sees enough dead birds and doesn’t wish to read about more tragedies. I have immediately curtailed that practice. Do you agree with her? I really am very disappointed, because I have communicated with her and even wished to visit her in the spring. We have a lot in common. I hope that I can change her mind. I also think that there is plenty of other excellent coverage of the tragedies. I am enjoying being positive. I look forward to your responses.

Now, I really have other work to do.

I hope you are staying safe and warm.

Make it a good day.

 

I can’t believe I’m writing this!

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Blog 2-23-14

Birds on my property ( recorded as seen)- Carolina wren, house wren, tree sparrow, tufted tit mouse, blue jay, mourning dove, chickadee, junco, downy woodpecker, white-breasted nuthatch, male cardinal, purple finch,

                1 rotten, no good, very bad, but unfortunately, also very smart, red squirrel squirrel.- I’m still working on trapping it. You’d think that it would do anything for peanut butter (that I stole from Bella) and real unsalted peanuts (that I stole from the woodpeckers). But, oh no. The squirrel is now hanging out on the far tree. Next strategy. Move the trap out there. Ugh! I don’t want to go outside in the cold weather again to trudge through deep snow. However………. Do I want to trap this squirrel, or not? Stay tuned= same time, same station……..squirrel climbing cut-off yews to provide perches for my birdies- who did I just see?- you got it- 1 red squirrel. Life is sometimes not fair. I don’t like it all the time.

I can’t stand it! I just moved the trap out to the tree and immediately saw the varmint back on my front porch. The war continues. I may be a nonviolent Quaker, but I am a smidgeon close to hiring an Amish sharpshooter to get rid of the pest. Maybe I should calling myself a nonviolent person? What do you think?

My friends, including some of you, are aware of my problem. As I write, the tv is on. CBS Sunday Morning is discussing hoarders. Uh oh. I have that very problem. Now, I am still in the process of cleaning out closets and giving away items to the needy and Second Chances Thrift Shop on Fairmount Ave, in Jamestown. Aren’t I a good person?

Not necessarily. I’m starting all over again collecting. Now, it’s art. I’m addicted. Where am I going to put it all? The back porch is pretty much filled. The laundry room is not- yet. Maybe there’s room for one more piece in the kitchen. The living room- lots of room- a small space over four of the five doors, over the couch and in the corner. Bedroom- lots of room. Room at the bottom of the stairs and up the stairs- lots of room. Upstairs narrow hallway to the guest bedroom- lots of room. Upstairs study- lots of room. Finally, the guest bedroom- lots of room. What about the basement? Nah- too moist and molding.

Now, back to the report. They suggest that hoarders are really mentally ill. Uh oh. I do know somebody

(I can’t mention who, because his family might disown and sue me.) His house is SO full, that a skinny person barely can fit through the paths in his house. He now has demention.

You’d think that that would be enough incentive for me. Too bad. I’m having too much fun. Even with the risk, don’t you think that it’s worth it. Don’t bother answering, if you don’t agree with me. I’m not about to change. Have I told you, just in case I progress in this problem sooner than later, I am researching assisted-living establishments? No kidding. You never know. After all, I am a young? 67 years old.

New gift of art- My friend Ron, gave me a belated birthday present. I’m so grateful. This is a painting, not a reproduction, by a local artist, Ann Wiggers. The subject is the one-room school house, now owned by my friend Nancy, who taught with me in the stone age in Clymer. Nancy inherited the property from her mom, also, a teacher. The former school house holds many antiques,  that were used in many local one-room school houses. Also donated are other antiques used in the early 1900s.

Nancy now opens the museum to Clymer Central School second graders every year. The children and their teachers hold their classes in the museum. What a wonderful opportunity. Many children dress up in period clothes. They are bussed to a safe place across route 474. Then, they have to walk a short distance, with supervision to the old schoolhouse. They need to bring their own lunches, of course. AND they have to use a cold outhouse for a bathroom. Ugh! Nancy, many thanks are given to Nancy and the Clymer Board of Education, who continue to allow this program. Also let’s not forget the parents, who spend much time providing period clothing.

Now, my birthday gift. Let me quote information on the back of the painting:

                                                                NEWTON

                                                    Extra quality cotton

                                                 C A N V A S           B O A R D

                                                     Size                    14” x 18”

                                Winsor & Newton Inc.                   W

                                                New York                            N   

                                                   LONDON

                                                         OIL

                                                   COLOUR

                                                          W                     WILTON

                                                          N                            BRUSHES

                                Title                    Miller                      Hill

                                Artist             Ann   Wiggers                 Date 1972

Happy birthday to me, happy birthday to me, happy birthday to me, again! Yeh!

Oh, Here’s another song. I love you Ron, oh yes I do. When I’m not with you, I’m so blue. Do do do do, do do. Oh Ron, I love you, Boop, boop de boop, boop boop.

Don’t worry Sally, I’m taking your husband away from you. He’s just a special friend.

P.S. I have a lot of art matting and hanging to do. Busy, busy, busy. Thanks for listening and reading, friends. If you have suggestions, please do not hesitate. PLEASE HELP ME. No, I don’t really mean that.

Bella, where’s my hat?  Did you eat it? I can’t imagine why I can’t find it.

Sunday morning- museum of modern art= voice- blanch, series of the nanny. Came up with idea herself. President of cbs on plane with her. She said that he had the botty of ?Russel. played frole o nanny. Born in queens ny . unique voice. Favorite= valentinos’s. lay in bed listening parents on other side of wall laughing in bed.  Dreamed of beauty of school in hschool. Walked to school. Peter mark Jacobson, husband. Saturday night fever. Bit part. Natural for character work. Spinal tap. Last name drescher?  Off screen naturally survieved robbery rabbed, got him in jail. Became pregnant, historicte4my., life over as actress. Full recovery. “ still works” on CBS, never did anthing at expense of somebody else. Partner discovered he was gay. Turned real live into .. happily dressed another tv show, based on real live, never one for self pitty. Centerella- star on braodway- real fairy tale ending. Star in second largest house on broadw3ay. Very funny as wicked friends. Carry yourself with gait in movie- sign up fo physical therapy twice a week. Used to hang her head high an  

My neighbor just called me to ask if she could come over to wash clothes my washer? Is this ironic or not. I even offered for her to dry clothes in front of my pellet stove. I DO SO HAVE SPACE! Tip through the tulips. It ain’t over till it’s over.

I’m not signing off yet.

I can’t find my brand new 5 packs of index cards!

Enclosed are photos of my house at 11a.m., Sunday, 2-23-14. Sorry, John, honey. I know you’re rolling over in your grave. Just please don’t let your parents know.

P.S. Please, please pray for the poor folks in the Ukraine. Hopefully, it will help. Pray for their leader to be caught and put in prison- for life. I have absolutely no compassion for him.

PPS. Please take note of the pellet bag that is labelled “thrift shop”. If you need more proof, you are welcome to visit there and ask if they see me often. I will print this article off for them, so that they know it is okay with me. (Put it on your list of things to do, Ann.)

PPPS. I can’t believe that I’ve shared all this, even photos of my home, with you. All in the name of journalism. Maybe I’ll just conveniently forget to include the photos. Cheater, cheater, pants on fire! Who me?

PPPPS, Okay. I quit for a while. Did you know that I have other tasks to accomplish? If I don’t send the awful photos of my home to you,  just complain by replying to my blog. I bet that will draw you out. I, somehow, dread to see how many folks read my blog. Maybe I am small, but I have a big mouth. Boo hoo. Ha ha. Just kidding. I can take criticism. That’s not what some folks say. I know, I know. Shut up, Ann PPPPPS. I am not editing my work!

city feeders possibly spread disease among birds

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Blog 2-21-14

This report is extremely frightening. It’s just another reason for me to love my country home and property. Permission to share this was given in the article. Yeh! I couldn’t possibly do as good a job as in this piece.

Do bird feeders help spread disease? February 6, 2014Conservation This Week1 Comment

The bird feeder in your backyard may seem like a pleasant and innocuous way to attract wildlife. But feeders could also increase the transmission of parasites among certain city birds, a study in PLOS ONE suggests.

The authors wanted to find out how city life affected the prevalence of animal disease. Other studies have yielded different conclusions depending on the species: blackbirds, for instance, seem to have fewer parasitic infections in cities, while urban woodchucks, bumblebees, and northern cardinals are more sickly. But researchers usually just compared cities and the countryside rather than studying areas with varying levels of urbanization.

To take a more nuanced look, the study authors caught 174 house finches at seven sites in the Phoenix area, with landscape characteristics ranging from cultivated plants to asphalt. Each site was scored for factors such as disturbance, density of people, and plant cover. Then the team determined whether the birds were infected with avian poxvirus, which causes lesions, or coccidian parasites that colonize the gut.

Poxvirus infections were more common and coccidian parasite infections were more severe in sites with higher disturbance and human population density, the authors report. The study suggests that “a decrease in natural land cover associated with human development is the driving force behind the increase in urban parasitism,” the team writes.

Figure 1 Do bird feeders help spread disease?

The relationship between an urbanization score (PC1) and severity of coccidian parasite infections in house finches in the Phoenix, Arizona area.

The results don’t necessarily apply to all birds or pathogens. But intestinal parasites, which can be transmitted through contact or feces, might be more likely to spread in places where birds congregate, such as feeders. Avian poxvirus also can spread directly from bird to bird.

The team checked levels of oxidative stress in the finches and didn’t find a link to the degree of urbanization or infection. But cities might still affect the animals’ physiology in other ways — for instance, by altering hormone levels or weakening immune response. Roberta Kwok | 6 February 2014

Source: Giraudeau, M. et al. 2014. Parasites in the city: Degree of urbanization predicts poxvirus and coccidian infections in house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus). PLOS ONE doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0086747.

First image © Al Mueller | Shutterstock

Second image © Giraudeau, M. et al. 2014. Parasites in the city: Degree of urbanization predicts poxvirus and coccidian infections in house finches (Haemorhous mexicanus). PLOS ONE doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0086747

 

apology for mistake

I received a message from Jerry Lazarczyk. Here it is.

 

Hi Ann,
Thank you for the kudos. And another surprise. I am caretaker for the Buffalo Ornothological Society’s (BOS) Wildlife Nature Sanctuary on Grand Island. Completely separate from Audubon (there is no Audubon presence on Grand Island). This is where we have falling outs. It is not very difficult to check your facts. I like your writing but expect that you get the facts correct, at a minimum. You loose a lot of credibility. Many BOS folks know the facts and you did not. I hope you will step up and correct yourself.
Incidently  many years ago I used to fish on the Canadian side of the Niagara River opposite from Squaw Island in my boat and caught many trout and salmon. Many of the finest moments of my life were captured there. The current is very fast and swirly but the fishing is heavenly. Many of the fish I caught were a lifetime dream type fish, and some days I caught 4 or 5 like that. Wow.
BTW, the Screechie apparently is a one day wonder. I have not seen it after that 1st day. A few days before I saw it, a bird hit my living room window at night at the feeders. I had only a split second look but I thought it was a screechy.
Thank you again,
Jerry
I am so sorry for the horrible mistake. To all the BOS folks, Jerry, and my readers. This was a stupid mistake on my part. Of course, I could have researched it. I just didn’t think I needed to do that. I think that I have made that mistake, with Jerry, before. I have no idea why I can’t get the Audubon location out of my head. This is just another result of 2 concussions and old age. I wish I could change both of those!

AnnB2 is…

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Ann Beebe - exploring nature in the Western New York region.

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